Soup Recipes




Soup Recipes – Recipes From Much Earlier Times ~1900
The water in which all vegetables are boiled may be saved for the making of either thick or cream soups. It may also be used as the basis for stock, and when I speak of stock in this book I mean a vegetable stock – something that can be kept on hand to he used for purees or cream soups. An ordinary colander will answer for the draining of vegetables, but a puree-sieve should be used for thick vegetable or cream soups. It is quite difficult to make a perfectly clear, brilliant vegetable bouillon, but if the following recipes are observed in detail, the results will be very satisfactory.
Vegetable soups are more nutritious than meat soups. We shall divide these soups into three classes: Clear soups, which should be used at the beginning of a dinner or a heavy lunch; milk, or the so-called cream soups, to be used for luncheons or suppers where they are counted as part of the nutrition of the meal; thick purees, which may he used for dinner or lunch, and which contain sufficient nitrogen to take the place of meat.
STOCK
Scrape and chop fine one carrot; peel and chop one onion; wash and chop the outer portion and the green leaves of one head of celery and peel and chop two good-sized turnips. Put in your kettle a tablespoonful of sugar. Let the sugar burn and then add four tablespoonfuls of olive or peanut oil and all the vegetables; shake over the fire for at least half an hour until the vegetables are slightly browned. Then add two quarts of cold water, a half pint of canned tomatoes, or two whole tomatoes cut into pieces, one apple cored but not pared, a teaspoonful of salt and either a chopped green pepper or a dash of cayenne. Cover and simmer gently for one hour. Strain and stand aside to cool. This may be served as clear soup or it may be used half-and-half with milk for a cream soup, or it may be used for a puree in the place of milk, or for macaroni, rice or vermicelli soup, or reheated and used the same as consomme.
JULIENNE SOUP
Cut into shreds a young carrot; throw it into boiling water and boil until tender. Add two or three tablespoonfuls of nicely cooked green peas and a few shreds of lettuce. Heat a quart of stock; add the vegetables; season and serve.
TOMATO BOUILLON
Peel four good-sized tomatoes; cut them into halves and press out the seeds. Chop the tomatoes and add them to a quart of stock. Boil twenty minutes; drain carefully through a fine sieve; season with salt and pepper. Serve in bouillon cups with a tablespoonful of whipped cream on top.
MOCK CLAM BOUILLON
Scrape a dozen roots of salsify; put them at once in cold water to prevent discoloration. Cut into slices and put them in one quart of stock; add a teaspoonful of salt, a dash of cayenne and a saltspoonful of celery seed. Boil until tender; strain; reheat and serve in bouillon cups with a tablespoonful of whipped cream on top. The salsify or oyster-plant may be used for vegetable oysters, or may be served as a vegetable.
CONSOMME WITH ALMOND BALLS
24 almonds
1/2 pint stale bread-crumbs
Whites of two eggs
2 quarts stock
1 teaspoonful salt

Blanch and put the almonds through a meat grinder. Add them to the bread-crumbs; add the salt and the whites of the eggs unbeaten. Work this mixture until it is moist, and then roll into tiny balls. Brown them in hot oil; lift them with a skimmer and drain them on brown paper. Put them at once into the soup-tureen and pour over the stock that has been heated and seasoned.

CONSOMME WITH GERMAN FARINA BLOCKS
1 egg
4 tablespoonfuls farina
2 teaspoonfuls olive oil
1 quart stock
1/2 teaspoonful salt

Beat the egg without separating until light; then stir in the farina and the salt. Put the olive oil in a shallow frying pan. When hot, pour in the farina mixture. Push it on the back part of the stove where it will brown slowly. Then turn it as you would a pancake and brown it slowly all the other side. Cut the cake into cubes of a half inch, put them in the soup-tureen and pour over the stock heated and seasoned.

CONSOMME’ a la ROYAL
1 egg
1/2 teaspoonful onion juice
1 quart stock
1 saltspoonful salt
1/2 saltspoonful pepper

Beat the egg until the white and yolk are well mixed; add the onion juice, salt, pepper and two tablespoonfuls of milk. Turn the mixture into a small custard cup, stand it in a pan of hot water an d cook in the oven until the custard is set. Turn it out carefully and cut it into dice. Put these dice into the soup-tureen ancl pour over the hot stock.

IRISH SOUP
1 can green peas
1 saltspoonful celery seed, or Whites of two eggs
1 tablespoonful green tops of celery chopped fine
1quart stock
1/2 saltspoonful salt
1 saItspoonful pepper

Drain the peas carefully; wash them and drain again. Press them through a sieve sufficiently fine to reject the skin; add the salt, pepper and celery. Beat the ‘whites of the two eggs very lightly, add them to the peas, and turn them into a square tin basin or pan. Stand the pan in another of hailing water and cook in the oven for at least twenty min­utes. until the mixture is set. Let it stand in the pan until cool, then turn it out carefully on a board and cut it into blocks or fancy shapes. Bring- the stock to boiling-point, drop the blocks in and serve at once.

SAGO SOUP
This recipe will also answer for tapioca soup. Wash carefully two tablespoonfuls of sago or tapioca. Add to a quart of stock, bring to boiling – point and cook until transparent. Season anel serve.
BARLEY SOUP
2 tablespoonfuls pearl barley
1 quart stock

Wash the barley in cold water; cover it with boil­ing water; boil rapidly for five minutes and drain. Cover it again with fresh boiling water and let it cook slowly for at least two hours; drain. This water may be saved to use as barley water or it may be put aside to use in tomorrow’s stock. At serving time, heat a quart of stock, add the barley, let it boil five minutes, and serve.

INDIAN SOUP
1 tablespoonful peanut or other butter
1 large sour apple
1 teaspoonful (or sprig) thyme
1 quart stock
1 onion
Juice of half a lemon
1 teaspoonful curry powder
1 teaspoonful salt
2 tablespoonfuls rice

Put the butter in the kettle; add the onion, sliced; cook slowly without browning; then add the apple, cored and sliced, but not parcel; add all the season­ I11gs; stir for a moment and add the stock. Cover, bring to boiling point and simmer gently ten min­utes. Wash the rice; throw it into boiling water awl boil until tender. Drain it, put it in the soup tureen and strain over the hot soup. Many persons serve with this soup a large dish of boiled rice  and put a helping of rice in the centre of each soup-plate before ladling in the soup.

PORTUGUESE SOUP
1 quart stock
8 nice prunes
1 large onion or 3 leeks
1 teaspoonful salt
1 teaspoonful paprika

Wash the prunes and soak them in cold water over night. One hour before serving time, cut the onion or the leeks into slices; put them in the stock and cook on the back part of the stove. At serving time, acid the prunes, salt and paprika. Turn at once into the tureen. Have at the side of the tureen bits of toast at least two inches square. These must be toasted carefully in the oven until crisp to the centre. Put a square in the centre of each plate, ladle over the soup, allowing two prunes to each person. This quantity will serve four.

PUREE OF TOMATO
1 can tomatoes
1 small onion
2 tablespoonfuls butter
1 saltspoonful ground mace
2 tablespoonfuls flour
1 teaspoonful salt
1 saltspoonful pepper

Put all the ingredients, except the butter and flour, into a saucepan. Bring to boiling-point; acid the butter and flour, rubbed together. Stir and boil for five minutes. Strain through a fine sieve, pressing through as much of the pulp as possible. Reheat and serve with croutons, If fresh tomatoes are used, select eight good-sized tomatoes : cut them into pieces. It is not necessary to peel them. Cook twenty minutes before adding the thickening.

PEA AND TOMATO SOUP
1 can peas or 1 pint green peas
1 onion
1/2 pint chopped celery
1 quart stewed tomatoes, either canned or fresh
1 teaspoonful salt
2 tablespoonfuls flour
2 tablespoonfuls butter
1 saltspoonful pepper

Peel and chop the onion; put it with the tomatoes, peas and all the seasoning into a saucepan. Bring to boiling point and boil fifteen minutes. Add the butter and the flour, rubbed together. Cook ten minutes longer, and press through a sieve. Serve with croutons.

CELERY AND TOMATO SOUP
1 quart tomatoes
1 pint chopped celery
1 pint water
2 tablespoonfuls butter
2 tablespoonfuls flour
1 teaspoonful salt
1 saltspoonful pepper

Put the water, the celery and the tomatoes into a saucepan; stew thirty minutes and press through a sieve. Add the butter and flour, rubbed together. Reheat, season and strain into the tureen. Serve either with croutons or with puff-balls.

PUREE OF DRIED BEANS
Wash and soak one pint of soup beans over night. In the morning, cover them with fresh boiling water, boil five minutes; drain and throw the water away. Cover with two quarts of boiling water and cook until the beans are tender. Press through a colander. Return the soup to the kettle and add a teaspoonful of salt, a dash of pepper and a tablespoonful of either ordinary dairy butter or nut butter. Serve with croutons.
PUREE OF DRIED PEAS
Make the same as puree of dried beans.
PUREE OF LENTILS
Make precisely the same as puree of dried beans. Lentils cook more quickly than beans. If either of these purees settle, they are too thin; add a little thickening of flour, reheat and serve.
BLACK BEAN SOUP
1 pint black turtle beans
1 lemon
2 quarts stock
1 teaspoonful salt
2 hard-boiled eggs
1 saltspoonful pepper

Wash the beans and soak them over night. In the morning drain, cover with boiling water and boil thirty minutes; drain, throwing the water away. Add the stock and cook slowly for two hours. Press the whole through a colander and then through a sieve. Rinse the kettle and return the soup to it; add salt and pepper. Slice the eggs and the lemon; put them into the tureen, pour over the boiling thick soup and serve.

MEXICAN BEAN SOUP
Make precisely the same as black bean soup, using red kidney beans. Add, after the soup is strained and ready to serve, a Spanish sweet pepper, cut into strips.
VEGETABLE SOUP
1 carrot
1/2 pint peas
1 tomato
1 turnip
4 tablespoonfuls rice
1/2 pint fresh beans
1/2 teaspoonful salt
1 saltspoonful pepper
2 quarts water

Scrape the carrot, peel the turnip, and cut them into dice. Put them in a kettle with the water and beans; these may be young Lima beans, or just the ordinary kidney beans. Cook slowly thirty minutes. Add the tomato, peeled; and cut into bits, the peas, salt and pepper. Cover and cook thirty minutes longer. While these are cooking, boil the rice, drain it, and throw it into the soup. The soup is now ready to serve. Corn and white potatoes may also be added.

PEAS PORRIDGE
1 pint split peas
6 leeks, or 2 good-sized 0nions
2 slices bread
2 tablespoonfuls butter
1 head celery
1 pint mashed potatoes
2 quarts water
1 teaspoonful salt
1 saltspoonful pepper

Wash and soak the peas over night. Next morn­ing, put them in a kettle with the water. Cut the onions or leeks into slices; chop the green portion of the celery; put them in a Frying-pan with the butter that has been heated; stir until they are a golden brown. Put them into the soup-kettle with the peas; add the bread, salt and pepper. Cook slowly one and a half hours. Press through a puree sieve, returning the soup to the kettle; add the mashed; potatoes and bring to boiling-point. Strain through a fine sieve and serve at once with croutons. This should be a thick puree; if not, add a tablespoonful of butter and one of flour, rubbed together, just before bringing it to the last boil. Peas Porridge should be almost as thick as breakfast oatmeal or mush. It is highly nutritious; in fact, it has more than meat value. Served at the beginning of a dinner, one would only need a salad and dessert to make the meal complete.

GROSSMUTTER SOUP
2 young carrots
1 potato
1 quart boiling water
1 onion
2 tablespoonfuls butter
1 egg
1 bay leaf
1 teaspoonful kitchen bouquet or browning
2 slices bread
1 teaspoonful salt
1 saltspoonful pepper

Scrape and slice the carrots; peel and slice the potato. Put the butter in a shallow pan; when hot add the vegetables; shake until they are well browned; then put them into the soup-kettle with the water; add the bay leaf, the salt and pepper; simmer thirty minutes; press through a sieve; return to the kettle; add the kitchen bouquet. Cut the bread into dice; beat the egg without separating;add the bread, and stir until each piece of bread is covered with the egg. Lift the bread from the egg, drop it into the soup, bring to boiling-point, and serve.

CREAM OF ASPARAGUS SOUP
1 bundle asparagus
1 pint water
2 tablespoonfuls flour
2 tablespoonfuls butter
1 quart milk
1 slice onion
1 bay leaf
1 teaspoonful salt
1 saltspoonful pepper

Cut the tips from the asparagus and throw them into cold water; put them aside to use either for asparagus in ambush or for asparagus salad in tomatoes. Cut the remaining portion of the bundle into small pieces; wash them in cold water; put them in a kettle; add the pint of water and stew gently for half an hour. Press them through a colander, taking as much of the flesh as possible. Put the milk into a double boiler; add the bay leaf and the butter and flour, rubbed together; cook until it is slightly thickened; add the salt, the pepper, and the asparagus pulp; stir until hot, and serve. If overcooked, the soup will curdle. Many people like the asparagus tips; boiled in salted water, drained and added to the soup just at serving time.

CREAM OF CORN SOUP
6 ears (or 1 can) corn
1 slice onion
2 tablespoonfuls butter
2 tablespoonfuls flour
1 quart milk
1 teaspoonful salt
1 saltspoonful pepper

Score each row of grains through the centre and with a dull knife press out the pulp. Put the milk in a double boiler; when hot, add the corn, onion and the butter and flour, rubbed together; stir until the milk begins to thicken; cover and cook fifteen minutes. Add the salt and pepper, remove the onion, and serve with croutons.

CREAM OF GREEN PEA SOUP
1 pint shelled green peas
1 quart milk
1 pint water
1 slice onion
2 tablespoonfuls butter
2 tablespoonfuls flour
1 teaspoonful salt
1 saltspoonful pepper

Put the pods of the peas in the water and boil gently for fifteen minutes; strain. saving the water. To this add the peas and onion; cook fifteen minutes and press through a colander; add the milk to the pulp; put the whole in a double boiler; add the butter and flour, rubbed together. Stir and cook until the soup is creamy (about ten minutes). Add the salt and pepper and press through a fine sieve. Reheat and serve with croutons.

CREAM OF POTATO SOUP
4 medium-sized potatoes
1 sliced onion
The green portion of a head of celery or a saltspoonful of mashed celery seed
1 tablespoonful flour
1 tablespoonful butter
1 quart milk
1 bay leaf
1 teaspoonful salt
1 saltspoonful pepper

Pare the potatoes and drop into boiling water; boil rapidly five minutes; drain, throw the water away. Return the potatoes to the kettle; cover with a pint of water, add the onion, the bay leaf, celery and pepper. Cover the kettle and cook until the potatoes are tender. Press the whole through a colander. Put the milk in a double boiler; add the butter and flour, rubbed together. Add the potato and salt; cook until simmering hot and not a moment longer; strain the whole through a fine sieve. This soup may be kept warm in a double boiler for about ten minutes; it cannot be reheated after it is once cold.

CREAM OF TOMATO SOUP
1 quart milk
1 pint strained tomatoes
1 bay leaf
1 blade mace
1 teaspoonful sugar
1/4 teaspoonful baking soda
2 tablespoonfuls butter
2 tablespoonfuls flour
1 teaspoonful salt
1 saltspoonful pepper

Put the tomatoes in a saucepan; add bay leaf, salt, pepper and mace; simmer gently ten minutes. Put the milk in a double boiler; add the butter and flour, rubbed together; stir constantly until smooth and creamy. Strain the tomatoes into the tureen; add the sugar and soda and pour in quickly the hot thickened milk. Serve immediately. This soup cannot be kept long and cannot be reheated.

EMERALD SOUP
2 quarts spinach
1 quart milk
1 tablespoonful grated onion
2 tablespoonfuls butter
2 tablespoonfuls flour
1 teaspoonful salt
1 saltspoonful pepper

Cut the leaves from the spinach; wash thoroughly through several cold waters, each time lifting them up with the hand and throwing them in another pan of cold water. Put a good-sized kettle on the fire; when hot, throw in the spinach; cover and push it at once over a slow fire. Let it stand for fifteen minutes until the spinach is thoroughly wilted. Drain, saving the water that has exuded from the spinach. Chop the spinach very fine, then press it through a sieve. Put the milk in a double boiler; add the butter and flour, rubbed together; stir until you have a perfectly smooth creamy mixture; then add the spinach pulp and water, salt, pepper and onion. When very hot, serve. Lettuce or endive may be substituted for spinach, using two large heads.

SOUP SOUBISE
1 large Spanish onion, 3 Bermuda, or 3 white or brown-skinned onions
1 quart milk
1 pint water
2 tablespoonfuls butter
2 tablespoonfuls flour
1 teaspoonful salt
1 saltspoonful pepper

Peel the onions; cut them into slices and put in a saucepan with the salt and water; cook half an hour, until tender, and press through a sieve; add the milk, then the butter and flour, rubbed together, taking up a little of the soup and mixing it until smooth; add the pepper. Press the whole through a sieve, reheat and serve.

CREAM OF MUSHROOM SOUP
1/2 pound mushrooms (Agaricus campestris )
1 tablespoonful corn starch
2 tablespoonfuls butter
1 quart milk
1 teaspoonful salt
1 saltspoonful pepper

Wash the mushrooms but do not peel them; cut into thin slices, using all the good portion of the stem; put them, with the butter and salt, into a saucepan; cover closely and cook slowly twenty minutes. Add the milk and pepper. Moisten the cornstarch with a little cold milk; stir it into the hot mixture and cook slowly until the soup is the consistency of thick cream. Serve at once, ladling it over squares of toast, or pass with it whole wheat bread.

CHOWDERS
These thick soups are nice for luncheon or supper. or for a dinner where light vegetables follow. They have meat value. Pass ship-biscuit or unleavened bread, and olives, celery or radishes when serving chowder.
CORN CHOWDER
1 quart grated corn
4 good-sized potatoes
2 medium-sized onions
2 tablespoonfuls butter
1/2 pint boiling water
3 tablespoonfuls flour
1 pint milk
6 water-crackers, or 3 ship-biscuits
Yolks of 3 eggs
1 teaspoonful salt

Pare and cut the potatoes into dice; chop the onion; put a layer of potato in the kettle, then a sprinkling of onion, then a layer of corn, then potato, and so continue until all are in. Add the water; cover the kettle and place over a slow fire where the contents will simmer twenty minutes. Rub butter and flour together; add milk and salt; stir until boiling. When hot, take from the fire and add the egg yolks beaten with two tablespoonfuls of milk. Turn all into the tureen; crush the crackers and sprinkle over the top. Serve at once.

POTATO CHOWDER
6 medium-sized potatoes
1 large onion
1/2 pint chopped celery
1 pint water
1 teaspoonful salt
1 tablespoonful chopped parsley
2 tablespoonfuls butter
1 tablespoonful flour
1 quart milk

Pare and cut the potatoes into dice; chop the onion; put the butter in a shallow frying-pan; when hot add the onion; shake until it is slightly browned. Put a layer of potatoes in the bottom of the kettle, then a layer of celery, a little parsley, salt and onion, and so continue until all the materials are used. Add the water; cover the kettle and simmer twenty minutes. Do not stir. Add the milk, and when hot add the flour, moistened with a little cold milk, and the salt. Stir carefully until it reaches the boiling­ point, and serve at once. To give this dish meat value add the yolks of two eggs or a quarter of a pound of grated cheese just before taking from the fire.

TOMATO CHOWDER
6 large ripe tomatoes, or 1 can tomatoes
1 pint, or 1 can corn
1/2 pint chopped celery
3 tablespoonfuls butter
1 large onion
4 hard-boiled eggs
4 slices whole wheat bread
3 tablespoonfuls flour
1 teaspoonful salt
1 saltspoonful black pepper

Peel the tomatoes; cut them in halves and press out the seeds; cut each half into quarters; put these with the corn, celery and onion, chopped, in the kettle; cover and simmer half an hour; cut the bread into dice and toast in the oven until crisp. Rub the butter and flour together; add a little of the hot chowder; stir and add this to the ingredients in the kettle; stir until smooth and boiling. Add salt and pepper. Slice the eggs and put them in the tureen; pour in the chowder and put the toast over the top. Serve at once.

BRUNSWICK STEW
1/2 pint green lima beans
1/2 pint peas
6 ears corn
4 whole tomatoes
6 pods okra
2 good-sized onions
4 tablespoonfuls rice
2 tablespoonfuls butter
1 teaspoonful salt
1 saltspoonful pepper

Put half the butter in a saucepan; add the onion, chopped; shake until the onion is soft, not brown. Peel the tomatoes, cut them into halves, squeeze out the seeds, then cut each half into quarters; add to the butter and onion. Boil the beans and peas; add to the tomato and onion. Cut the okra into slices, add it to the tomato; cover, cook on the back part of the stove for thirty minutes. Then add the beans and peas that have been boiled and drained and the rice, washed. Score and press out the corn, add it, and if the stew is now thick, add a half pint of milk. Cover and cook until the corn is done (about twenty minutes), being very careful not to scorch. Add the remaining butter, salt and pepper. This is also very nice made with cocoanut milk or with vegetable stock.

Regarding Recipes – No warranties are expressed or implied. Information is provided as a “best effort”. We endeavor to be accurate, but inaccuracy may happen. Results may differ due to ingredients, oven temps, altitude, water quality, and skill level of the cook. Please note that you may have to find substitutes for some ingredients, an example being lard (unless that is your preference). Substitutions may also change the dynamics of the recipe requiring experimentation.